Contents

/* custom css */. td_uid_2_5f379d7602430_rand. td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .

Handloads: Will Your Gun Blow Up?

Handloads: Will Your Gun Blow Up?/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f379d7602430_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f379d7602430_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } Wayne’s Springfield sporter in .30-06 Improved has a 7-digit serial number, higher than the 800,000 that marked the end of low-carbon, case-hardened receivers in 1917. When it comes to reloading ammunition, Wayne van Zwoll says handloading cartridges requires special attention. Firearms come apart when gas pressures from burning powder can’t leave soon enough. Time matters. Pressures can’t build to dangerous levels if you don’t give them time. On the other hand, you must give pressures time to build to useful levels. The bullet is an obstruction. Its resistance (friction and mass), plus barrel length and the relationship of bore to case capacity determine the appropriate powder and charge. A charge of fast-burning Bullseye powder behind a lightweight bullet in a .45 ACP pistol generates a sharp, quick thrust. It must, because that short bullet is easily dislodged. Cowboy Action ammo loaded to mild pressure helps safeguard this pristine, valuable Winchester 53. As it races through the short bore, a huge space opens instantly behind it. The powder has little time to work before its energy dissipates. Think of a ping-pong paddle in action. A rifle powder such as 4350 in a bottleneck case like a .270 generates pressure more slowly as it burns. The bore is small, relative to case capacity, and the bullet long. An instant burst of energy from Bullseye wouldn’t give the sustained push needed to overcome bore friction and accelerate the long, slim .270 bullet through a long barrel. Related GunDigest Articles Gun Digest Reloading Video Series Episode 01: Basics of Reloading "Gun Digest Reloading" "Video Series Episode" 8: Troubleshooting Gun Digest Reloading Series Episode 11: Bonus Tips Heavier charges of fast powder would lift pressures to dangerous levels. Bore space behind the bullet wouldn’t increase fast enough to relieve it. Think of that ping pong paddle meeting a baseball. The paddle (or your wrist) would yield before the momentum of the incoming ball could be reversed. Like handgun ammunition, shotshells use faster powders than those in bottleneck rifle hulls. The heavier the shot load, the slower the powder. Short pressure curves don’t mate well with slow acceleration against high resistance. Also, shotgun barrels and/or actions weren’t designed to bottle stiff pressures. Big bores and straight cases flush pressure out fast. Rifles of modern steel seldom come apart. Acceptable breech pressures of smokeless centerfire rounds as determined by SAAMI (Sporting Arms and Ammunition Manufacturers Institute) run from around 42,000 psi for the .30-30 to over 60,000 psi for high-velocity magnums. Powders must match not only cartridges but bullet weights. Choose carefully; handload conservatively. Several bolt rifles safely digest proof or “blue pill” loads of more than 100,000 psi. Famously, Springfield 1903 receivers to serial number 800,000 (in 1917) were of case-hardened, low-carbon steel, not as strong as subsequent double-heat-treated receivers. These acceded to even stronger nickel-steel receivers at serial number 1,275,767 (in 1927). Proper charges of proper powders help keep your rifle intact. But careless mixing of cartridges can make even safe loads hazardous. Once a pal inadvertently loaded a .308 round in his .270. The .308 cartridge is shorter, so the bolt closed before the bullet met the smaller neck of the .270 chamber.

What the Pew Pew Writers Carry [2017]

What the Pew Pew Writers Carry [2017]

Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s Several of you have been asking the question “What do you recommend for carry?”.  Well, that’s kind of  a big question, and it has a lot of answers.  Choosing a CCW gun is an intensely personal decision, and all we can really do as advise you on what to look for in your carry gun, and talk about what we ourselves carry. Which is what we’re going to do today.  I rounded up some of our writers and asked them what they were carrying, and here’s what they came back with. Note: This isn’t all the writers, but we’ll be updating in waves so be sure to check back in for more of our personal carry choices. Annette’s Carry Guns While I try not to have a “carry rotation,” I do need different-sized guns for different occasions. Right now, my concealed carry needs are met by these three: Glock 19 My current EDC is a Glock 19 equipped with a > Tau Development Group Striker Control Device and a few other goodies, carried in a PHLster Classic .  A 19 is a lot of gun for someone my size, but I’m able to conceal it in most casual clothing.  Since I carry in the appendix position, I really appreciate the SCD as an extra layer of safety while I’m reholstering, something not yet available in any other striker-fired gun. Glock 19 Carry Gun As a nearly full-size gun, it’s extremely shootable which means I can be confident that if I need to shoot, I will make the necessary hits.  Plus since I’m relatively petite and need to trade off carrying a spare magazine for other items like my pepper spray and tourniquet, it’s nice to have 15+1 rounds in the gun itself.  The Glock also has the advantage of being one of the most supported platforms in the aftermarket.  That means parts, accessories, and service like sights, holsters, and gunsmithing are readily accessible. SIG Sauer P320 Subcompact SIG P320SC When I need something a little smaller because I need to conceal my gun better, in more formfitting clothing, I carry a SIG "Sauer P320 Subcompact" .  Mine is 9mm and almost entirely stock.  While it’s substantially smaller than my Glock 19, I only lose three rounds of capacity.  Since my competition gun is a full size P320, I am intimately familiar with the platform and that makes a big difference in my comfort level in trusting my life to this gun. The author’s personal 3-gun pistol, a SIG Sauer P320 with Springer Precision magazine well and extensions. I have my hands on my competition P320 nearly every day in practice and while my Subcompact isn’t quite the same, it’s similar enough that almost all of my skills with the gun transfer.  That means I give up less in performance than I would with another, similarly-sized gun.  I’m also well assured of my gun’s reliability because of my familiarity with P320s generally, and have excellent aftermarket support as a result of my immersion with the platform in other contexts. Kahr P380 Sometimes, I have to dress in a way where almost no gun can be hidden except my diminutive Kahr P380 .  I don’t usually have pockets in my girl-pants that are big enough for the gun, but it’s very easy to tuck away in a low-profile AIWB holster or even a Flashbang bra holster (but never a Lethal Lace holster ) .  I don’t like to carry this gun a lot because it’s harder to shoot well than my larger carry guns and it is lower capacity with a smaller caliber, but given the choice of no gun or my P380? Kahr P380 I’ll go with my P380 every time because it’s a gun I can carry in any outfit, no matter what the occasion.  I’ve also shot it enough to know that it’s reliable with all of the ammunition I use, and with night sights, an oversized slide release, and the ability to lock back on an empty magazine, I find it less difficult to aim and manipulate than other microguns. Brandon’s Carry Guns Glock 19 (Again) I think the G19 is one of the most balanced CCW handguns out there. That’s not to say that there aren’t guns that are easier to conceal carry than the G19, but you’re probably not going to find many handguns that have the same dependability and affordable sticker price as the G19.  And as long as you’re not wearing super slimfit clothing, it’s a pretty easy gun to conceal. Personally, I recommend dressing in clothing a little baggy or wearing fall/winter wear when concealing it – at least with the older models.  My G19 is a Gen3, so it’s a little bigger than the Gen4 and 5 models. Glock 19 Aside from that, the G19 is a pretty straightforward gun – it’s a Glock, so you know that it’s going to be hardy and accurate. Springfield XD-S While I don’t have a Springfield XD-S of my own, I was lucky enough to get some range time with my buddy’s 3.3” 9mm and now I’m considering making that my next purchase.  I was surprised at how comfortable the gun felt, both in my hand and when it’s holstered. XDS in .45 ACP and 9mm over at Guns.com Another reason why the XD-S is in my top-three list of best CCW pistols is its variety. Since it comes in two available sizes, the 3.3” model and the 4” version, you’re able to choose what’s more important to you: easier carrying or easier shooting. But even if you go with the slightly larger option, you still won’t have any problems making the XD-S your daily CCW pistol. Note: Along with the 9mm, you can get the XD-S two other calibers: .40S&W (only available for the 3.3”) and .45ACP. Smith & Wesson M&P Bodyguard BG38 You probably didn’t expect to see a revolver make my top-three CCW list.  The truth is that I’m a big fan of wheel guns, and the .38 Spl is a dependable cartridge that has more than proven its effectiveness in self-defense scenarios.  On top of that, the Bodyguard’s small frame and snubnose barrel makes it a comfortable gun to carry around, and its hammerless design helps ensures that you get a snag-free draw every time.  Overall, the Bodyguard is a reliable pistol that’s easy to conceal and packs a powerful punch. For this reason, I prefer this gun over other pocket pistols, like the .380. Travis’ Carry Guns CZ P09 I have two carry guns, but I don’t carry them at the same time.  Recently I’ve taken to carrying a full sized gun.  My gun of choice being the CZ P09 in a strongside OWB holster.  I alternate between my HTC light bearing holster and my Alien Gear Cloak Mod OWB holster .  I prefer the larger gun due to it’s full sized grip, it’s longer sight radius and well, 21 rounds of 9mm is comforting. OWB Carry with CZ PO9 is totally possible…IWB is another story I stopped caring about printing and started carrying something I felt gave me the sharpest edge.  I’ve upgraded the trigger with  a Cajun Gun Works short reset kit and have put a few thousand rounds downrange.  I’m confident in the gun as a platform, and run it with the decocker. Walther PPS My second gun is my alternative in situations where I can’t carrying a full sized gun do to dress requirements and do something subtle.  I go with the classic Walther PPS .  It’s a 9mm with a long grip, it’s superbly thin, and provides me 9 rounds of 9mm. It’s not quite a pocket pistol but with my Clinger Gear No Print wonder I carry discretely and comfortably. The Walther is a simple, no nonsense concealed carry gun that’s plenty modular. You can swap the backstraps for comfort, as well as the magazine size for a flush or extended fit. Walther PPS M2 Both guns have never let me down, and hopefully never will. Parting Shots There we have it folks, our first round of author carry guns.  We’ll be regularly updating this with the other author’s carry guns, as well as the editorial staff’s selections, so be sure to check back in as we add things.  Hopefully this has given you some inspiration for your own carry choices, and will help you out when picking one for yourself.  Whether its your first gun, or your fifth. Once you’ve gotten your carry gun, check out our Best Concealed Carry Holsters and also Best CCW Insurance Review . What do you think about our choices?  Any questions for our authors?  Let us know in the comments below!

Is There a Difference Between .223 and 5.56?

Is There a Difference Between .223 and 5.56?

The comparison between .223 and 5.56 isn’t a new one, so there is a lot of discussion to weed through to learn about the two. Ultimately, because they originated from the same cartridge, they are very similar, but that does not mean that they are necessarily interchangeable. This article discusses three key differences between .223 Remington and 5.56x45mm NATO. .223 Remington and 5.56x45mm Dimension Measurements At a glance, the two rounds are indiscernible. Both rounds use a bullet of .224in in diameter and an overall length of 2.26in. In general, the external dimensions for the two calibers are identical. What’s more significant is the pressure of the two rounds and the difference in the rifle chambering. .223 Remington and 5.56×45 Pressure Measurements One of the problems with comparing these two cartridges is that they utilize different methods of measuring pressure. SAAMI (Sporting Arms and Ammunition Manufacturers’ Institute) measures the .223 pressure at the center of the casing, whereas the NATO standard measures the pressure at the throat (or leade) of the chamber. To rectify the two different methods, several have undertaken experiments with their own standardized recording method to compare “apples to apples.” One such thorough study was carried out and recorded in detail by Andrew Tuohy posted via Lucky Gunner Labs (click here to read the full article). Tuohy evaluated various .223 and 5.56 ammo fired through rifles chambered for .223 Remington and 5.56x45mm. His, and the research of others, confirms that, generally, shooting .223 through a 5.56 chamber results in lower pressure, but still functions (safely). Firing 5.56 through a .223 chamber, however, results in somewhat higher pressures. Although the differences aren’t massive (~5% in the previously referenced study), extensive firing of 5.56 through a .223 chamber could lead to over-pressure malfunctions, such as popped primers or blown cartridge case heads and other firearm malfunctions. .223 Remington and 5.56×45 Chamber Differences The most important difference between .223 and 5.56 chambers is the length of the throat (or leade) for each chamber. More specifically, the leade is located at the mouth of the barrel before the rifling occurs. Comparing the NATO and SAAMI regulations, the leade for 5.56 chambers is nearly twice as long as that of a .223 chamber (.162in to .085in, respectively). If a 5.56 round contacts the barrel rifling too early, it can cause pressure spikes (leading to malfunction, and potentially damage) in the chamber. This explains why it is safe to fire .223 through a 5.56 chamber, but not recommended to fire 5.56 through a .223 chamber. Bruce (my first AR15) is chambered for 5.56x45mm NATO. Which should you choose? As with so many elements of making a firearm purchase, the “right” option is subjective. If all you intend to purchase are .223 Remington rounds, there is nothing wrong with getting a rifle chambered for .223. However, if you want the option of firing milspec 5.56 through your rifle, you may prefer picking up a 5.56 chambered rifle. After all, you can still fire the .223 through it, safely, if you want. Price and personal preference are also factors to consider when making that decision. What works for you? Featured images of Remington UMC and WInchester M855 ammos courtesy of midwayusa.com

Survival Gear Review: Survival Guides to Edible and Medicinal Plants of the Rocky Mountains

Survival Gear Review: Survival Guides to Edible and Medicinal Plants of the Rocky Mountains

Survival Guides are a dime-a-dozen, but good ones, the real save-your-life guides are as rare as hens teeth. Luckily the two new plastic-covered foldouts from Jason Schwartz over at Rocky Mountain Bushcraft are an outstanding and necessary contribution to your survival kit that literally could save your life. For less than the cost of a box of American made ammo, you could outfit your survival gear with some to-the-point literature can make a difference when on an afternoon hike, or when the S really hits the fan. Published in 2016 by the ultimate pocket guide company, the Waterford Press , these guides join an ever growing list of speciality reference booklets. “Putting the World in your Pocket” is Waterford’s motto, and it could be true given they’ve had over 500 publications with over five million sales. Quick Navigation Fast Food Walkabout Knowledge is Power and Power Corrupts The Doctor Is In Fast Food The two water-resistant guides under discussion are Edible Survival Plants of the Rocky Mountains , and Medicinal Survival Plants of the Rocky Mountains . Both guides are in the classic Waterford six-fold design leading to 12 individual vertically oriented pages. The full-color guides are printed on white paper and laminated heavily with factory-installed bends between pages. The pictures are a godsend and make for fast field ID of plants. The brief descriptions confirm the identity and instructions follow for applying the part of the plant in the most useful form. Some are used as tea, some as topical, and some eaten outright. The philosophy behind the guides according to their author is to, “provide a set of handy, yet realistic reference guides that will help hikers and backpackers lost in the Rocky Mountains forage for food, or treat injuries and ailments using wild plants and trees.” An assumption the author makes is that most survival situation are from three days to a week. This is reflected in the use of often low-calorie plants to get you to a better place and keep your spirits up. Walkabout In my own testing of the guides, I wandered my million acre backyard and looked for both plants listed in the guides and to see if a plant was in the guide. In most cases the obvious plants were covered, while locating specific plants took some time. A suggestion, if space permitted, would be to mention common locations of plants if they exist. Like kinnikinnick, dandelion, and thistle on old roads where the soil had been compacted decades earlier. Knowledge is Power and Power Corrupts Poaching plants is easily as abundant as poaching animals. While the hunting laws don’t often address North American medicinal plants, there is the concern that someone with a little knowledge and a bunch of free time might pillage the local area of important plants. And in one rare case with the Curly-Cup Gumweed, there is a plant “species of concern” because it resembles a medicinal plant mentioned in the guide known as the Howell’s Gumweed . There is a very slim chance in a small region of the west that the more rare related species (Howell’s Gumweed) will be over harvested by an overzealous collector, but human nature is anything but predictable. "Edible Survival Plants" of the Rocky Mountains: A Folding Pocket Guide to... Edible Plants of the Rocky Mountains is a simplified guide to familiar and widespread species of... Schwartz, Jason (Author) See Price on Amazon Last update on 2020-08-14 at 11:08 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API Related: Bushcraft Mushrooms According to Schwartz, the highlighted plants were chosen for the wide distribution, easily identifiable traits, and ubiquitous presence across landscape and seasons. So with that said, you can take Rocky Mountains with a grain of salt. You will encounter most of the plants in these guides well outside the rugged terrain of the west, but not so much on the plains, east coast, or desert America , of course. The Saguache County Colorado Sheriff’s Department found the guides so particularly helpful that they adopted them as essential equipment to have when backcountry survival might be an issue. The Doctor Is In Half the pages of the "Medicinal Survival Plants" of the Rocky Mountains IDs 18 plants of which seven are trees. The other half of the guide explains treatment options, medicinal preparations including infusions, tea, decoction, juicing as well as plant feature identification and author bio. Half the Edible Survival Plants of the Rocky Mountains IDs 19 plants of which three are trees. And the reverse six pages of the over half include survival basics, 16 images of types of edible plants, the steps of the Universal Edibility Test, general plant preparation and eating practices, and a note on edible plant myths. Read Also: Tree Bark as an Emergency Food Each entry for a plant across both guides includes a description, the habitat, harvesting tips, preparation (in the Survival guide), and comments and cautions. I had to smile when reading about the Ponderosa Pine in the Survival guide. Jason Schwartz is a bushcrafter through and through. In the middle of the description Jason uses 15 words to explain baton. The baton, by the way and in Jason’s words is, “an arm’s length branch used as a mallet to pound the back of the knife.” Once a teacher, always a teacher. Here’s the deal with these guides. They cost little and weigh almost nothing. They are filled with lifesaving options for when you really need them, and you don’t even need to read them ahead of time (but I would suggest it). And anyone living within 200 miles east or west of the Continental Divide should spring for the $8 apiece and put a set in every bug out bag and car or truck glove box. Better yet, head outdoors and familiarize yourself with the local edible and medicinal flora. You’ll thank me and Jason later. Medicinal Survival Plants of the Rocky Mountains: A "Folding Pocket Guide" to... This beautifully illustrated guide highlights the most familiar species of medicinally relevant,... Schwartz, Jason (Author) See Price on Amazon Last update on 2020-08-14 at 11:08 / Affiliate links / Images from "Amazon Product Advertising" API Save Save Save Save Other interesting articles: Wild Edibles & Poisonous Plants of the Poison Ivy Family Emergency Foods from Wild Plants Medicinal Uses of Pine Trees and Their Relatives in the Northeast Five Emergency Toothache Remedies From Wild Plants

California Ammo Freedom Day

Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s California has beaches, mountains, deserts, and enough farmland to feed nations. But we can’t order ammo online and have it sent to our homes. And if we do want to buy ammo, we first need a background check for reasons . Yep… we’re back to the armless bear 🙁 Thankfully, the California Rifle & Pistol Association, NRA-ILA, and others have been fighting hard to get these laws overturned. And for about a day, they won . The Injunction and Stay In the afternoon of April 23rd, the honorable Judge Benitez issued an injunction in the case of Kim Rhodes, et al. Vs. Xavier Becerra . The ruling, a 120-page document giving a Mr. Becerra a major literary ass-kicking, placed a hold on a section of CA law that grossly limited our freedom to buy ammo. This kicked off a buying frenzy much like Freedom Week did in 2019 (that week was also brought to us by Judge Benitez) However, the state of California predictably did not agree with this ruling and filed for a stay on the injunction . Benitez denied the motion , so California appealed to the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals. Sadly, they did issue an emergency administrative stay . MRW I read the stay. Well, I wasn’t actually surprised. But I was mad. What Does This Mean Now? I’m not a lawyer and I don’t play one on TV. But from what my understanding is that we’re basically back to where we were on Wednesday. Californians cannot: Buy ammo online and have it shipped to our door. Buy ammo across state lines and bring it back. Buy ammo without a background check. California trying to buy ammo, 2019, colorized For those of us that bought ammo AFTER the injunction but BEFORE the stay (roughly, after 4/23 3:00pm PST but before 4/24 9:45pm PST) what we did was legal and your ammo should be able to be legally shipped to you. Taking possession of that ammo, even though you will be taking possession well after the stay, should be legal. However, that does not mean that all retailers will be shipping the ammo bought during that time frame. There are some retailers that have announced that they will be, but not all of them. So far Brownells is the only major retailer that I’ve seen publicly state that they will be processing and shipping orders made during Freedom Day. If you want a complete break down of CA Ammo laws, we’ve got a detailed article for you ! What Happens Next The stay that was issued is not final. It was only an administrative stay meant to give the court time to actually hear the case regarding CA’s demand that the injunction is stopped. The motion to stay the injunction still needs to be actually heard by the 9th circuit, they will then issue a ruling either upholding the injunction or striking it down. Either way, the case then goes back to the district court and Judge Benitez to finish hearing the full case. A ruling will come down eventually about that and we’ll see what happens. How Long Does This Take? It depends, but it’s going to be a while. We should get an answer to the stay/injunction first and that should be within a few weeks. The full case after that might take a year or two. Any Good News? Hell ya! We got a 120-page document from a federal judge saying how important gun rights are! I’d rather have the rights themselves, but at least I got a cool letter. Right? That’s good news, isn’t it? Really though, Judge Benitez has an amazing way with words and writes at a quality far above the average judge. So if you’re interested in reading some awesome excerpts of the ruling — read on. Otherwise… go back to day-drinking during the quarantine. Or do both, I won’t judge. Judge Benitez Injunction Excerpt I strongly recommend reading the majority of the document , but if you just need some talking points for when you’re trying to explain this mess to your not-gun-nut friends — these are my favorite quotes. The man, the myth, the legend. The Honorable Judge Benitez . Right off the bat: The experiment has been tried. The casualties have been counted. California’s new ammunition background check law misfires and the Second Amendment rights of California citizens have been gravely injured. The order starts with no punches being pulled and only ramps up from there. Something many law makers seem to forget is highlighted early in the ruling: These new laws are constitutionally defective for several reasons. First, criminals, tyrants, and terrorists don’t do background checks. Furthermore: Nevertheless, the Second Amendment is not a “loophole” that needs to be closed. And lastly: Presently, California and many other states sit in isolation under pandemic-inspired stay-at-home orders. Schools, parks, beaches, and countless non-essential businesses are closed. Courts are limping by while police make arrests for only the more serious crimes. Maintaining Second Amendment rights are especially important in times like these. Keeping vigilant is necessary in both bad times and good, for if we let these rights lapse in the good times, they might never be recovered in time to resist the next appearance of criminals, terrorists, or tyrants. Parting Shots Freedom Day is now over, but hopefully, most of us were able to get an order or 10 in before it closed. The fight is still being fought and we’ll be keeping an eye on the situation. If you’re interested in helping the cause, please donate to CRPA or other great 2A rights groups . Tell us my dudes, did you get an order placed? Did they refund it or are they shipping? What is your favorite Judge Benitez quote? Let us know in the comments!

Best AR-15 1-4x Scopes 2020 Buyers Guide

As an introduction, here is a quote from the SIG Sauer Electro-Optics Review by Craig Boddington on American Rifleman's website. “My old friend and a great sheep hunter, Jack Atcheson, Jr., once commented that 'optics cost nothing and weigh nothing.' What he meant, of course, is that the role of optics is so important that neither how much you pay for them nor how heavy they are to pack should be significant factors in your choices.” Optic Rifle Scopes have become a necessity for modern shooters. Choosing a scope for your AR-15 depends upon several factors, with the most important being the range of your rifle. The most basic type of variable rifle scopes available in the market is the 1-4x scope. Here, we’ll be talking about these scopes and their effective use with your AR-15 platform. We’ll also take a look at some of the best 1x-4x scopes available on the market. At a Glance: Our Top Picks for 1-4x Scopes for the AR-15 OUR TOP PICK: Nikon M-223 1-4×20 Trijicon Accupoint TR24 1-4×24 Vortex Crossfire II 1-4×24 Bushnell AR Optics 1-4×24mm Comparison of the Best 1-4x Scopes IMAGE PRODUCT Our Top Pick Nikon M-223 1-4×20 Specifically designed to fit your AR-15. Featuring spring-loaded Instant Zero-Reset Turrets. It can be used with Nikon’s Spot On Ballistic Match Technology. View Latest PriceRead Customer Reviews Trijicon Accupoint TR24 1-4×24 Illuminated Red Triangle Reticle powered by tritium. Aircraft-grade aluminum housing, waterproof and fogproof. A variable scope with true 1x magnification at the low end. "View Latest Price" → "Read Customer Reviews" Vortex Crossfire II 1-4×24 Non-illuminated V-Plex reticle with Duplex crosshairs. Compact 1-4x24mm riflescope with 30mm main tube. Low-powered scope with an extremely wide field of view. View Latest PriceRead Customer Reviews Bushnell AR Optics 1-4×24mm It comes with a 2nd focal plane Drop Zone 223 BDC reticle. Exclusively designed scope for the AR-15 with 4 times magnification range. Low-profile turrets provide a generous 100 MOA windage and elevation ranges. View Latest PriceRead Customer Reviews What is a 1-4x Scope? What are these numbers and what do they mean? If you are a novice with optic scopes, these numbers define the magnifying power of a scope. Magnification refers to the number of times an object can be viewed closer or enlarged. A 1x scope provides one times the magnifying power, a 2x provides two times the magnifying power and so on. This means that with a 2x scope, you can view an object that appears to be two times closer than its present position. Scopes can have fixed or variable magnifying power. With fixed power scopes, you can attain only a fixed magnifying power while viewing through them. A variable scope offers a wide range of magnifying powers. For example, in a 1x-4x scope, you can attain magnification of 1x, 1.5x, 2x, 2.3x, so on and so forth to a maximum of 4x magnification. Variable scopes are good for taking shots at different distances and for different target sizes. Another important aspect of an optic scope is the objective lens diameter. For example, if a scope is marked as 1-4 x 24 mm, then 24 is the diameter of the objective lens in millimeters. The objective lens is in the front and is the aperture where the light enters the scope. A larger objective lens means more light will enter the scope, which in turn will generate a brighter and clearer image. Other important factors are the reticles and focal plane of a scope. A reticle was simply known as a crosshair some decades ago, until the advent of the latest, more technically-advanced crosshairs known as reticles, ranging from duplex and BDC to mil-dots and illuminated ones, there are numerous reticle types available in the market. Another important aspect is the focal plane. There are FFP (First Focal Plane) and SFP (Second Focal Plane) scopes available in the market. The basic difference among these is that, while you zoom over the target, the reticle size increases respective to the target in an SFP scope, whereas in an FFP, it does not. SFP scopes are without a doubt amazing for long-range shooting. One very minor and often overlooked factor to check for in a scope are the target turrets. These turrets have knobs to make adjustments for windage and elevation for long-range shooting. Before buying a scope, you must ensure that target turrets are accurate, easy to use, and audible (if that’s available in your price range). Perks of Using a 1-4x Scope Since we are talking about adding 1-4x scopes to the AR-15, let’s look at some of the reasons this combination makes sense. Teach The Basics When a novice learns shooting, the trainer has to explain the fundamentals and basic techniques. A 1x-4x scope is an appropriate choice for teaching anyone about long-range shooting. Of course, here we just mean longer ranges than you can view with the naked eye. The AR-15 proves to be an excellent rifle for teaching people to shoot with centerfire rifles. A 1-4x scope ensures that proper basics of shooting through scopes are learned without letting them get bogged down in the more complex adjustments of higher-range scopes. Range of the Rifle According to the instruction manual, the effective range of an AR-15 rifle is 550 meters (600 yards). Remember, this is the effective range. If you are shooting heavier subsonic rounds or using bull barrels, you can achieve another 100 - 200 meters, but that’s as an expert shooter. A 1-4x scope is quite effective in the normal range, giving you a clear shot at different distances. Hunting in the Woods AR-15 rifles are among the most-loved rifles for hunting in North America. The silent recoil, weight, powerful ammo, and easy operation make it a great tool for hunting. If you’ve been on hunting trips (especially for whitetails and mule deer), you might be aware that high magnification scopes are next to useless in dense woods. That’s because once you try a higher magnification, all you’ll see will be magnified tree trunks with beetles on them. Quick Adjustments Scopes with 1-4x optics offer optimum magnification for quick acquisition of targets over varied distances. Devices with higher magnification powers are quite difficult to adjust and it is a struggle to create a perfect sight-picture at short distances. These 1-4x scopes offer quick adjustments in line with the range of your AR-15 rifle. Weight More power means larger lenses, more components, and thus, a heavier scope. A 1-4x optic scope has a comparatively smaller objective lens, small main tube, and fewer components. This helps reduce its weight, meanwhile keeping it effective at the shorter distances you’ll probably be shooting with your AR-15. Quick Take - The Best AR-15 1-4x Scopes These are our recommendations for the best 1-4x scopes for the AR-15: Nikon M223 1-4x20 Trijicon Accupoint TR24 1-4x24 Vortex Crossfire II 1-4x24 Review of the Best 1-4x Scopes for the AR-15 Let’s take a quick look at some of the best low magnification scopes that will mount to your AR-15 . Best Overall: Nikon M223 1-4x20 CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros Point-blank reticle Single-piece durable main body Eye box technology with a constant 4” eye relief Enhanced ring mount spacing means it can be attached to any rifle, including magnums Cons Weighs 13 ounces, which is a bit more than its counterparts What Recent Buyers Report Many people prefer low-magnification scopes over red dot sights because of their versatility and reliability. Whether you need short-range precision or accurate shots to 200 yards, Nikon's point-blank reticle will deliver fast and accurate shots. However, for some customers, this is not the best solution since this shrunken and thinned variation of the standard duplex reticle with a big dot in the center covers the bullseye, making target engagement slower than with a red dot or other similar type sights. This is not an illuminated reticle and in combination with small 20 mm objective lens, it is less than ideal for super-low-light conditions. Anyway, the M-223 1-4x20 riflescope incorporates some of the latest adjustment technologies from Nikon Sport Optics, which provides excellent optical clarity entirely above par at this price point. Why it Stands Out to Us Nikon Optics has released two scope lines dubbed M-223 and P-223, designed explicitly for AR-15-style rifles in standard chamberings. Our model number NK16300 from the M-223 family boasts 1x-4x zoom power and 20 mm objective lens. This low-magnification scope offers a vast field of view and permanent four-inch eye relief for quick and effortless target acquisition. For a low-magnification scope and slender body, it is unusual to see bulky exposed target-style turrets for windage and elevation. However, they come in precise 1⁄4-MOA increments and provide up to a whopping 120 MOA of total adjustment. The M-223 also sports a very long body because of the two-inch long sunshade which provides the optic with excellent anti-glare performance. The Nikon's M-223 1-4x20 Riflescope is assembled in the Philippines and consists of a one-inch aluminum single-piece tube, which is nitrogen-filled and O-ring sealed to make it completely watertight. You can purchase separately Nikon's Spot-on Custom Turrets and one-piece mount for the M-223 for attaching it to your AR-15. A masterpiece from Nikon, the M223 has been specifically designed to fit your AR-15. The 1-4x scope features a 20 mm objective lens, which creates bright images for the effective range of an AR-15. The wide field of view and point-blank reticle provide quick and effortless target acquisition. The patented ultra-clear-coat optical system provides an incredibly flat sight picture and maximum light transmission. The elevated target turrets offer precise ½ MOA adjustment for windage and elevation. Nikon’s eye box technology offers a constant four-inch eye relief. The single-piece, main body construction is nitrogen-filled and O-ring sealed. The scope is waterproof, shock-proof, and fog-proof. Who Will Use This Most This scope is made with .223 AR-15 style rifles in mind, especially when coupled with a unique mount explicitly developed for the M-223 series of scopes that fits Picatinny rails found atop most flattop ARs. The M-223 is also a solid option for those interested in competitive shooting, like three-gun or other events where it commonly requires fast transitions between close and medium-range targets. With a lifetime warranty, this M-223 is definitely your best option for home defense and a go-to scope you can depend on without worrying about damaging or scratching it in the harshest hunting or tactical conditions. Bottom Line With a fully multi-coated optics and  4x zoom range, Nikon’s M-223 comes with noticeable improvements over the more affordable P-223 line. The Nikon M-223 scope offers similar basic feature sets and capabilities of higher-end family of Nikon scopes such as the target turrets with return-to-zero capability and crystal clear glass, which boasts up to 95-percent light transmission. Runner-up: Trijicon Accupoint TR24 1-4x24 CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros Zero forward emission Aircraft-grade aluminum body Illuminated Triangle Reticle with SFP Battery-free operation due to tritium phosphor lamp Auto-adjustment of the illumination with manual override as well Cons A bit heavier than its counterparts (14 ounces) What "Recent Buyers Report" While the Accupoint 1-4x24mm is a "true" 1x scope, it comes with a noticeably narrower field of view at 100 yards compared to similarly priced optics. The eye relief in the TR24R is advertised at 3.2″ which may be bordering for shooters, but since it is mainly intended for use with small-caliber ammunition, it may not represent a big problem. Why it Stands Out to Us The Trijicon Accupoint 1-4x24 has a traditional scope configuration that uses a tritium aiming-point illumination for speed target acquisition. This battery-free optic utilizes fiber-optic technology with a tritium phosphor lamp to illuminate the reticle in low to no light. "The Trijicon Accupoint" TR24R features a post-style Tri-Dot reticle with a triangle on it that is illuminated by fiber-optic spool located by the ocular. Besides the red color, there are also amber or green– TR24A and TR24G, respectively. The sharp triangle reticle is set up in the second focal plane and allows you both open eyes while shooting at 1x and allows easy movement up to 4x magnification. The TR24R caomes with turrets capped with threaded aluminum covers and marked in 1/4 MOA increments. The Accupoint's main body 30 mm tube is made of 6061-T6 aluminum and weighs in at 14.4 ounces by itself. The Trijicon Accupoint has a lifetime limited warranty, with a 15-year guarantee on the tritium as an illumination source. The Trijicon Accupoint TR24 optical rifle scope has a 1-4x magnification with a large 24 mm objective lens. The scope features a tri-dot illuminated reticle which does not require batteries to operate. The fiber-optic technology automatically adjusts the illumination of the reticle (a manual override option is available). The tritium phosphor lamp illuminates the reticle in low to no light. The illuminated reticle does not project any light through the front objective lens. Sealed in a high-grade aluminum casing, the multi-coated lenses provide superior clarity with zero distortion. Who Will "Use This Most" Sealed in a high-grade aluminum casing and equipped with a multi-layer coated lenses, the Accupoint 1-4x24 is perfect for those big game driven-hunts or competition (3-gun) where close encounters are common and a wide field of view is a must. The Trijicon TR24R is ideal for close-range shots, but it also works from point-blank to about 350 yards, providing hunters optimum aiming-point illumination. Bottom Line While the 1-6x riflescopes have quickly become the new standard for low-powered optics, the old-fashioned 1-4x, like the Trijicon Accupoint Triangle riflescope still holds its own. This low-powered scope, paired with Trijicon's patented triangle post, produces battle-proven aiming systems that speeds target acquisition and extends available shooting hours. Best for the Money: Vortex Crossfire II 1-4x24 CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros Illuminated reticle Dot reticle with duplex crosshairs Aircraft-grade aluminum construction Fast-focus eyepiece and long eye relief Backed by an unlimited lifetime warranty Cons Heavy (16 ounces) Effective with live batteries only What Recent Buyers Report The traditional duplex-type reticle is not illuminated, but paired with a wide field of view and fast focus eyepiece it is perfect for its intended purpose – fast tactical shooting on the move. The compact, rugged Crossfire II comes with capped turrets, but some users don’t prefer that design for dynamic shooting situations. Like all Vortex small magnification riflescopes, the Crossfire II 1-4×24 has fixed parallax on 100 yards, which allows for good, all-purpose use. However, a few shooters have issues with an appalling parallax at close range, which may be a fault of the quality control department. Why it Stands Out to Us However, like the high-end Trijicon Accupoint, the Vortex Crossfire II uses a 30 mm tube diameter rather than the one-inch tubes much of the competition offers. The large, one-piece housing is made of aircraft-grade aluminum and comfortably and securely provides reliable mechanics with a 4x zoom factor. While the entire construction is scratch-resistant, its waterproof, one-piece tube is nitrogen-purged for fog-proof use at low temperatures. All lenses are fully multi-coated for image brightness and contrast to assure accurate shot placement in low-light conditions. This entry-level wide angle riflescope offers a great field of view ranging from vast 96.1 feet at 1x to 24.1 feet at 4x zoom. It is a significant advantage for faster target spotting, acquisition, and tracking. The new Crossfire II line features longer eye relief of four inches and capped turrets to reduce the risk of damage. The new, zero resettable turrets provide a 1/2 MOA adjustment, offering a rather large maximal adjustment travel of 100 MOA for both elevation and windage. The second generation of Crossfire riflescopes is available with two types of reticles. Our model CF2-31047 features the simple and effective second focal plane V-Plex reticle. It also features multi-coated lenses for acquiring a clean and clear target image. The scope has been sealed with inert gases to keep it fog-proof, shock-proof, and waterproof under harsh weather conditions. The anodized aircraft-grade aluminum body makes the scope durable and apt for hunting trips. The fast-focus eyepiece, complemented by an illuminated center-dot reticle allows quick and easy target acquisition. The elevated target turrets allow re-indexing of the turret to zero after sighting-in the riflescope. The scope is backed by an unlimited lifetime warranty by Vortex. It is exceptional for three-gun competitions. Who Would Use This Most? The 1-4x24 mm Crossfire II Riflescope from Vortex Optics is a low-powered type of scope purpose-built for mounting on AR-style platforms or MSR rifles. While some gun authors deem it an entry-level hunting riflescope, the Vortex Crossfire II is a great option for your AR, regardless of whether you are hobbyist or expert shooter who may be using it for professional shooting. Like other 1-4x scopes, this is exceptionally good for hunting and three-gun competitions as they expand rifle shots to various distances out to 100 yards and beyond. This second generation of Crossfire riflescopes will perfectly be suited for varmint hunting out to 120 yards or target shooting from 0-200 yards. Bottom Line The Vortex Crossfire II 1-4x24 is an extremely versatile optic packed with many features that make it an ideal telescopic sight for your AR, shotgun, muzzleloader, or .22 rifle. Crafted from premium materials, this scope is one of the company’s more affordable offerings that will exceed the demands of most gun aficionados. 4. Bushnell AR Optics 1-4x24 CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros Excellent eye-relief Multi-coated optics Quality construction BDC 223 ballistic reticle Best value for the money Cons Comparatively heavy Reticle is not illuminated What Recent Buyers Report While the exposed turrets allow you to dial quickly and accurately with audible clicks, they aren’t as convenient to reset to zero as the push/pull style found on its counterparts. Besides, customers lament of the turrets adjusting being on mil-specifications, while the ballistic reticle doesn’t use mil-dots at all. If we look at similar class optics, this Bushnell compact scope is comparatively heavy at a weight of 16.9 ounces, but provides outstanding low-light performance. With further comparison, some users noted the image through this scope at 1X magnification looks closer to a 1.25X zoom. Why it Stands Out to Us The Bushnell line of AR optic riflescopes is available in six configurations, but the model AR91424 comes with their new Drop Zone-223 Ballistic Reticle, with aiming points out to 500 yards. This modified duplex-style reticle with four tapered posts and a thin crosshair is placed in the second focal plane (SFP). It is designed for use with 223 Rem/5.56 ammunition loaded with 55 to 62-grain projectiles. With fully multi-coated optics, the Bushnell AR optical system provides incredible brightness to the sight picture. This compact and straightforward riflescope provides a consistent 3.5" eye relief through entire 4x magnification range and generous a 112' field of view at 100 yards. Bushnell has created the ideal AR-15 optic with aluminum housing based on a single-piece 30 mm maintube that is waterproof and shock-resistant. They have accomplished the waterproof construction due to the O-ring which seals the optics to keep internal components dry inside. Besides that, nitrogen-purged optics remain stable regardless of ambient temperature for ultimate fog-proof protection. As the name suggests, this scope from Bushnell has been designed exclusively for the AR-15. Fully multi-coated optics provide incredible brightness to the sight picture. The Drop Zone 223 BDC reticle has caliber-specific markings and aiming points out to 500 yards to allow you to shoot every bullet with pinpoint accuracy. Who Will Use This Most This feature-packed AR optic offers both outstanding close-quarters accuracy and medium-range tactical target shooting. Though some customers claim that Bushnell AR/223 is an excellent entry-level riflescope, some professionals successfully use this optic on patrol rifles in the urban jungles. This optic is engineered for short distance target shooting – CQB. However, with ballistic compensation dots, this ultra-compact (9.5"-long), low-powered scope also represents a precise aiming tool for mid-range tactical scenarios. Bottom Line The Bushnell AR Optics family is intended for every AR platform from the .22 Rimfire to .223 Rem/5.56 firearms. Indeed, at this price point, it is not high-end glass, but it works flawlessly for short-range engagements. If you're looking for a good quality, fast-deploying optic to outfit your AR, the versatile Bushnell AR Optics scopes are a very good choice in the lower magnification range. 5. Leupold VX-2 1-4 x 20 CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros Lightweight Click adjustments Leupold lifetime guarantee Second focal plane duplex reticle Fog-proof, waterproof, and shockproof Cons No sunshade No holdover reticle Doesn’t have a zero stop The Leupold VX-2 scope has a variable magnification of 1x - 4x. The 20 mm objective lens is large enough to let a good amount of light enter the scope at ranges respective to the scope’s power. The index-matched lens system and lead-free glass offer a brighter image. A custom dial system lets you adjust the ¼ MOA windage and elevation easily with your fingers. The scope is fully waterproof and the tube is filled with argon/krypton to make it shockproof and durable. The click adjustments let you keep track of the windage and elevation without removing your eye from the ergonomic aperture. The scope weighs only 8.1 ounces and has a long eye relief of 3.7 - 4.2 inches. This Leupold VX2 scope also features a "Second Focal Plane" Duplex Reticle to let you take precise shots over a long distance. Conclusion Relative to the range of an AR-15, 1-4x scopes are an apt choice for taking short, mid, and long-range shots . Factors such as magnification, objective lens size, focal plane, and reticles affect the effectiveness of a scope. 1-4x scopes have a wide field of view (FOV) and are easily adjustable, making them great for hunting and three-gun competitions. Illuminated reticles may or may not be a concern while choosing 1-4x scopes because of your hunting habits and local state laws. By far, 1-4x scopes are perfect for your AR-15 if you’re not really looking to go sniping.

Summary

/* custom css */. td_uid_2_5f379d7602430_rand. td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .